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[warning: 600 words of indulgent waffle on identity politics]

I've never been good at pseudonyms, collective identities, self-reinvention. Nonmetheless, I consider them a Good Thing at a fundamental level. Your identity, or mine, is the accretion of social conformism, gender roles, the acceptance of our own position in society. You can try to unpick it, layer by layer, but the chances are you'll never get to a 'real you'.

Or you can take the shortcut: choose another identity, put it on, change it once it's no longer useful. Be Luther Blissett, be Spartacus. Be your friends, or your enemies, or some combination of them all.

[livejournal.com profile] steerpikelet just gave a wonderful interview, where she defends political action without a true name:


Anonymous is its own separate thing, an anarchic and brilliant thing, but the wider concept of anonymity itself as a political statement - whether online or offline - is gaining more and more ground as a way of rebelling against a political culture that not only seeks to root out unsavory elements with surveillance but which mandates individuality as a form of rigid conformity. Think about it: it you grow up being commanded to self-actualise, to be the best individual you can be, to define yourself by buying things, to be yourself and find your special centre and compete with your neighbors and colleagues, then choosing to be anonymous is an inherently revolutionary act, quite apart from the organising possibilities the phenomenon offers. Plus, there’s a growing sense that there is a great deal of power in the collective, in sharing a sense of solidarity, symmetry and protection in anonymity.


It's perhaps not a coincidence that Laurie writes this in an interview with a comics blog. If there's one area that comics have picked over in every possible regard, it's the secondary identity. Start with a world that has Clark Kent/Superman as the mainstream, where almost every hero wears a mask or leads a double life. Then in the 80s, along come Alan Moore and friends, devote their considerable talents to picking apart every aspect of the superhero identity. The Guy Fawkes mask now identifying Anonymous is just the smallest part of this.

The climax of this tendency, to my mind, is Grant Morrison's The Invisibles. A cell of superpowered freedom fighters draw their personalities by lot; each necessary identity is filled by a different person each week. Characters live under layers of assumed identities, brainwashing themselves at each level to forget the next layer. Heroes and villains turn out to be the same groups, veiling their consciousness in order to play out their roles. The end result is reminiscent of, say, Shaiva Tantrism. By the end, it seems that everybody is part of the same identity: a character in a dream, a player in a video-game, the 'fiction suit' with which God walks the earth, or part of a hyper-dimensional being.

Yes, this is part plot device, part stoner esoterica. But it's also a guide to discarding the unwanted parts of your past, and to acting as a group not based on prior hierarchies. And, as Laurie suggests, to dodging surveillance. When government and corporations devote so much energy to tracking and correlating our behaviour, it becomes almost a matter of duty to thow a spanner in the works. That is to adopt some identity not linked to a passport and a birth certificate. To dream a fiction suit, be it, share it, discard it, and move on to the next identity.

Date: 2011-05-14 06:13 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] the-alchemist.livejournal.com
I am in about three minds about this.

1) As a civil servant, I'm at even more risk than most people of losing my job over even fairly mild forms of protest, and this makes anonymity brilliant for me.

2) As someone with Asperger's Syndrome that kind of power in the (anarchic) collective just doesn't work for me. Individual I can do. Collective with clear rules, I can do. But my mind just doesn't twist itself into the shapes necessary for "solidarity, symmetry and protection in anonymity".

3) I'm weirded out that anyone who self-identifies as feminist can think that Anonymous (in the narrow sense, and unless I've made some kind of mistake and the quote refers to someone other than this Anonymous) can be "brilliant", as threatening people with rape and bullying/excluding anyone who admits to being non-male is a big part of what they do. But most other feminists are way more than weirded out that anyone who self-identifies as feminist can also self-identify anti-abortion or pro non-violent choice, I'm willing to cut Laurie and any others out there a lot of slack.

December 2016

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